Concrete pavements are the right choice, whether you’re planning new construction, reconstruction, pavement preservation, or pavement repair and rehabilitation. To see more examples of these strategies, please follow the links below to download case resources detailing new construction, pavement preservation/restoration, pavement repair and rehabilitation, and reconstruction.

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  • This two-lane rural highway is a vital link for trucks hauling oil-field supplies and agricultural products, so keeping traffic flowing with minimal disruption was a must. The contractor used a combination of a flagger station and pilot car to manage traffic. This approach, along with excellent staging and well-planned delivery of materials on the grade, resulted in an efficient and cost-effective reconstruction project.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • This two‐lane rural highway is a critical element of the Colorado portion of the Ports to Plains Highway, which spans from Laredo, Texas, to Denver, Colorado. Because of high truck traffic and high maintenance costs of asphalt, the Colorado DOT specified concrete pavement for the entire length. Most of the corridor uses a 10.75 in. concrete overlay on existing asphalt, although 12 in. concrete was used for full depth repairs of structures and for transitions to existing surfaces.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • This project involved both the first and largest bonded concrete overlays on asphalt on Interstate‐70 in the state of Kansas. Attention to detail in staging and an innovative maintenance of traffic plan helped make this complex and challenging project a success.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • Originally placed as two 12‐in. thick concrete pavement lanes in 1961, the pavement was widened to three lanes in 1973. In 1990, an asphalt overlay was placed on the existing pavement, followed by microsurfacing every few years. For performance and cost‐efficiency,the owner turned to a combination reconstruct and overlay, using 8‐in. minimum concrete overlay and 11 in. of new concrete pavement on this 7.2 mile section.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • This 7.7 mile highway is vital to the region’s industry and tourism, so when it needed to be resurfaced, keeping the road open and finishing the work on time were very important. Flooding just prior to the project meant paving during the prime tourism season and during the two hottest month. The delay, along with the requirement to pave during two of the hottest months of the year were no match for the team who completed the project more than two weeks early. Maintenance of traffic was one reason why.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • The deteriorated concrete pavement on Interstate 77 in Yadkin County made driving rough and sometimes dangerous. A design‐build project for this rural section of Interstate highway included a concrete overlay, shoulder widening, and new guardrail for improved highway quality and safety, but the project had four additional challenges related to maintenance of traffic.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • This 5.72 mile stretch of the West Dakota Parkway serves as a main traffic route for the oil development industry in the northwest quarter of the state. With the increased heavy truck loading, the existing asphalt intersections were rutting and deteriorating rapidly. Concrete overlays were selected to extend the life of the segment which included six intersections. Since there was no alternate bypass route, the intersections and side streets were paved under traffic, one lane at a time. With optimized field adjustments to construction sequences, the construction time was reduced by 5 weeks and the last intersection was completed two weeks ahead of schedule.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
  • This four-lane highway carries 40,000 vehicles per day through the heart of New York’s capital region, connecting I-90 and I-890. The reconstruction of the at-grade, signalized intersection with Watt Street was part of the full-depth complete reconstruction of several miles of the highway. The majority of the project was conventional slipformed concrete paving. Because the intersection was the first intersection off the Interstate, and provided access to two major commercial areas, traffic had to be maintained through the intersection in all directions at all hours. In order to accomplish this, precast concrete pavement was installed in the critical traffic areas, and cast-in-place concrete was used for shoulders and turning lanes.
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    • TrafficMaintenance
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